Hello, Bergen County!

I’m thrilled to be featured in both (201) Magazine and Bergen Magazine this month, commenting on some amazing savory recipes and local products. I’m a Bergen County native born and raised, and I love serving my home community with my nutrition practice located right in Ramsey, New Jersey (though I counsel all of New Jersey with virtual video sessions).

I love that these are hearty recipes that also feature fruits and vegetables to show clever ways of improving the nutrition of your favorite comfort foods. I also spoke a bit about the health benefits of hummus while discussing the NJ-made White Camel Hummus company, and if you live in NJ or NY and love hummus, I honestly recommend you grab some White Camel Hummus ASAP because it is phenomenal!

 

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201 Magazine Feature 2019

Great Grains: Farro

Farro is one of my *favorite* ancient grains, and it lives up to the hype of Super Food for sure!

One serving is 1/4c dry (about 1/2-2/3 cup cooked) and packs 6 grams of protein plus 5 grams of fiber to keep you satisfied and energized!

Whole grains intake is linked to lower rates of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, and certain types of cancer. The USDA recommends that at least half of your grains be whole grains, so it’s important to incorporate things like farro, quinoa, brown rice, or whole wheat into your day.

If you’re looking for a new whole grain to swap into your diet, try throwing farro into soup, making it into a healthier risotto, adding it to salads, or cooking as a side dish on its own.

Happy New Year: Crafting a Realistic Resolution

“New Year, New You!”
“This year, I’m going to be healthy!”
“My New Year’s diet starts today!”

New Year’s is the perfect time to hit the reset button — a fresh year represents a new start where you can commit to self improvement.  I love the idea of establishing a New Year’s resolution to help kick start your healthy changes, but it’s hard to overlook the tendency of resolutions to fizzle out by the end of February.

To stretch the lifespan of your resolution and create a long-lasting behavior, try making it a very specific goal.   The solution lies in a classic goal-setting acronym S.M.A.R.T. Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Time-Bound.  By tailoring your resolution

  • Specific: Define what actions you need to do to achieve your goal
    • If your overall goal is to be healthier, ask yourself HOW you will do that. Perhaps you want to eat more vegetables, less fast-food, or fewer refined sugars.
  • Measurable: How will you measure your success?
    • Avoid just stating you’ll do something “more” or “less” (work out more, eat more fruit, drink less coffee) and instead add a defined target goal, like eating at least 1 serving of fruit a day or going to the gym 3 times a week.
    • These concrete numbers will help you keep better track of your progress by giving you a reference point.
  • Attainable: Set goals you can realistically achieve
    • This is a huge part of setting successful goals- choose something that is challenging but doable, to make sure you can see it through.
    • If you haven’t touched a vegetable in years, it would be ambitious to say you’ll eat 3 servings of veggies every day. If you try to add one serving per day, though, you may stick with it much longer.
    • Similarly, you’re more likely to stick to “cutting back” than you are to “cutting out” foods or behaviors that aren’t particularly healthful. This will lead to sustainable behavior change so you can turn your resolution into your new norm.
  • Relevant: Is this goal going to help you achieve your big picture goal?
    • Here’s the key question: Will the specific goal you’re setting help you achieve the overall desired outcome?
    • If the answer is yes, then you’ve set a goal that aligns with your overall vision of health (relevant!).
    • If the answer is no, then your focus may have shifted throughout the process, so center your attention back on what it is you really hope to achieve.
  • Time-Bound: Factor in frequency or deadlines for your goals
    • There is no right or wrong timeline for a goal– it is entirely up to your current habits and your desired outcomes.
    • You might resolve to start eating at least one vegetable per day, one vegetable serving per meal, one new vegetable each week… They’re all worthwhile goals with a timing-specific limit (per day, per meal, each week).
    • Defining this aspect of frequency will help you be consistent, keep track of your actions, and know whether or not you’re hitting your target.

If you make your goals S.M.A.R.T, you will be able to gauge your success, stay dedicated, and hopefully see your resolution through for the year to come!

Wishing you a very happy, healthy 2019!

Top 5 Ways to Get Back on Track after Thanksgiving

We’ve officially kicked off the holiday season with Thanksgiving – and if you’re like most Americans, you ate several times the calories you normally would!  I’m a big believer in enjoying celebrations and eating guilt-free on those days, though even those who are normally mindful of what they eat can easily eat seconds and thirds of their favorite family recipes (followed by tiny portions of about 6 different desserts).

The key to surviving the holiday season from this point on while still adhering to your health goals is to take each day at a time- follow these tips to make it to New Year’s without backsliding into old habits.

  1. Leave the holiday splurges for the holidays.
    If you follow one tip all season, make it this one! Food traditions are at the heart of many holiday celebrations, so enjoy them on the actual day-of, but don’t carry those bad eating habits with you for the rest of the season!
    Whatever your major holidays are — Christmas Eve, Christmas day, Hanukkah, New Year’s Eve, a certain holiday party you’ve been waiting for — enjoy the food and drink on that day but go back to your normal eating routine once the event is over. If you carry out that celebration mentality every day until New Year’s and eat twice the calories you normally do, you can easily pack on the pounds or wind up with out of control blood sugars. This goes for leftovers as well; definitely enjoy those Thanksgiving leftovers, but serve yourself smaller portions so you don’t overeat like you may have while feasting with family.
  2. Listen to your Hunger Cues.
    If you’ve ever eaten to the point of becoming uncomfohunger scalertably full (a feeling very well associated with holidays), you probably ignored your hunger cues. Our bodies are great at telling us when we need to eat and when we can stop, but our love of flavor usually leads us to keep eating far beyond that point. Using a mental Hunger Scale can help you identify when you need to eat or wait so you can eat more intuitively. Throughout the season, ask yourself if you are eating because you are hungry (scale points 3 & 4) to the point of satiety (points 5 & 6) or beyond that (points 7 & above) so that you can enjoy your holiday treats without feeling stuffed.
  3. Don’t drink your calories.
        Alcohol is a major part of many holiday festivities, but it’s a two-fold trap when you are watching your health! First, alcohol is packed with calories – and the heavier the drink, the more calories it packs.  While a light beer or a 4 ounce glass of champagne has around 100 calories, a heavy winter lager or a martini can easily have over 200. Add creamy drinks like eggnog or dessert martinis and those drinks pack more than 300 calories each. The second trap here is that alcohol dulls your inhibitions and often leads to eating far more than you ever would while sober! This is especially true for anyone who restricts their eating on a daily basis, so if you tend to be a crash-dieter, you may find yourself eating twice what you normally would once alcohol silences that voice in your head. My tip is to cap yourself at once drink so you can enjoy yourself while still being able to hear your hunger cues rather than overindulging unintentionally.
  4. Plan ahead.
         This may be the least fun tip, but it’s the most practical. If you are going to a holiday party where you know your friend’s famous seven-layer dip or decadent dessert will be served, make a mental plan of how you will be allotting your calories. This can help you enjoy your favorite items without feeling guilt that you splurged all night long. A good rule of thumb is to try to divide your dinner into courses like you would at a restaurant: an appetizer, dinner, and dessert. Choose your favorite small app, a main course with protein and some vegetables if available, and one sweet plate (or drink) for dessert rather than grazing mindlessly all night.
  5. Stay mindful between meals.
    There are only a few actual holidays this season but many normal days with special treats lying around. If you love to buy seasonal snacks or work in an office with a constant supply of desserts, make a mental note of how often you are eating otherwise celebratory foods throughout the day. If you are having multiple sweets throughout the morning and afternoon, you are likely having way more calories and carbohydrates than you would eat any other time of year, and this can do a number on your blood sugars and waist line. Find a happy medium that works for you, like only eating workplace treats two times a week instead of every day or saving your treats at home for weekends.

If you find yourself struggling and need extra guidance on how to prioritize your health goals while still enjoying the holidays, nutrition counseling with a registered dietitian nutritionist can make a huge difference. I have a great holiday deal through the end of the year and an even better Black Friday deal through 11/26, so this is the time to book a session!

This weekend only!

**Now until 11/26- new client deal!** Get your first session for only $75!!

The Thanksgiving feast was just the start of the holiday food fest, so change your relationship with food starting TODAY with nutrition counseling! Why wait until New Year’s for a new you?

Meet online via video chat or in my Ramsey office- message or visit our website for details!

Promo code: BFDEAL

Is Your Food Dangerous? Top Food Safety Tips You Might Not Be Doing

We often take food safety for granted and assume that everything we buy is likely fine to eat until a predetermined expiration date, but the truth is that some foods have far higher risk of spreading foodborne illness.

Anyone with a weakened immune system, including children, the elderly, or anyone taking immunosuppressants or undergoing chemotherapy is at a particularly high risk of catching a foodborne illness, but even generally healthy individuals at at risk with certain foods or poorly prepared dishes.

My top 5 tips for ensuring your food is safe:

  1. Read about Recalls: Rely on trustworthy sources like FoodSafety.gov for recall information! This is a phenomenal way to stay updated about any foods that may have been tainted before they reach your kitchen. While many major recalls make headlines, smaller recalls can slip by under the radar, so FoodSafety.gov’s information can help you protect yourself.
  2. Choose Pasteurization: Always choose pasteurized goods including milk, cheeses, and fruit juices as the pasteurization method kills dangerous bacteria
  3. Avoid undercooked meat: Even though rare hamburgers and raw tuna taste like delicacies, many bacteria thrive at temperatures under 165 degrees Fahrenheit, so foods need to be well cooked to ensure safety.
  4. Take caution at buffets and salad bars: the huge selection can be tempting, but food that sits out without proper heating or cooling puts you at major risk of foodborne illness. If your hot food seems cooler than 140 degrees Fahrenheit or your cold salad bar items seem warmer than 40 degrees, bacteria can be growing all day long. Look for trustworthy locations where you see employees checking temperatures and bringing fresh trays out often. Also keep an eye out for servingware that falls into any serving dishes, carrying bacteria from whomever touched it last.
  5. Use your Judgment for Sell-By Dates: That beloved Sell By date on your package is only a guideline used by retailers to know when products are generally safe or should be tossed:

“Sell-By” dates are a guide for retailers. Although many products bear “Sell-By” dates, product dating is not a Federal requirement. While these dates are helpful to the retailer, they are reliable only if the food has been kept at a safe temperature during storage and handling.

— USDA Food Safety and Inspection Services

If a product was stored at an unsafe temperature at any time, that date is no longer a good estimate of how long the product will keep, so always evaluate your food carefully; if there is a change in odor or consistency, it may be a sign of spoilage. Also note that most refrigerated products should be used within 7-10 days of opening, so don’t keep your opened sour cream or salad dressing for 2 months just because the Sell By date hasn’t yet arrived!

Check out this article by Healthy Way featuring some foods that are particularly risky with input from a food safety professional as well as my recommendations for alternative options!

 

 

 

A new study links the Mediterranean Diet to lower risk of Macular Degeneration

A new article in the journal Ophthalmology examined the diets and health outcomes of almost 5,000 participants who recorded their eating habits and wellness outcomes over several years. After analyzing the group’s food frequency questionnaires (which help paint a picture of what foods people tend to eat frequently or avoid), the researchers found that those following a Mediterranean-style diet had a 41% lower chance of developing macular degeneration.

The most interesting finding that that no single element of the Mediterranean diet correlated strongly to risk of macular degeneration, which implies that the protection came from the diet as a whole rather than any one portion. The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits and vegetables, high in fiber with whole grains and legume consumption, and full of healthy unsaturated fats from plant oils, nuts, and fatty fish, while meat can be consumed in small amounts. These elements combine to help fuel your body and protect you from cellular damage. Adhering to this diet has been linked to cardiovascular health and lower risk of cancer, as well. To learn more about the components of a Mediterranean diet, check out these sources:

Bonus reading: Visit this summary from The Olive Oil Times to see The Peoples Plate featured as a nutrition professional commentator on the study’s findings!

Does your plate look like MyPlate?

  
The Food Pyramid (1992-2005)

I remember learning about the Food Pyramid in elementary school, and for myself and most of my generation, that was the only formal nutrition education I received. Eat healthy, follow the food pyramid.  I had no idea, however, how I was supposed to apply a pyramid to my actual food choices. I recall celebrating the recommendation that carbohydrates like bread should be the foundation of my diet and thinking that the little dots throughout the pyramid (meant to represent fats and added sugars) were just decorative polka dots, but that was the extent of my understanding. There were some lesser-known older recommendations from the USDA (you can find a full history of nutrition guidelines on the USDA website), but the Food Pyramid imagery took hold as the most recognizable symbol of ‘healthy eating’ for Americans.

MyPyramid (2005-2011)

By 2005, however, the USDA decided to give the beloved pyramid a makeover and created MyPyramid, which added the element of exercise, and peoples were less than receptive to the rebranding. While the overall message was good (fruits and vegetables should each be about as important as grains; exercise is a key component of ‘a healthier you’), the graphic came across as confusing and somewhat sloppy with its half-cartoon/half-photograph images of food heaped at the bottom like they had fallen onto the floor. Most people I know never even saw this image or perhaps simply blocked it from memory.

MyPlate (2010 to present)

In 2010, with the release of the updated Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the USDA launched an entirely new image with a non-pyramid campaign: MyPlate. This shift brought the dietary recommendations directly to Americans’ dinner plates and made the concept of ‘healthy eating’ more relatable.  For the first time, there was an image people could apply at each meal; where the pyramid was an abstract structure representing overall diet, the public could easily look at their plates and ask themselves: how does this compare to MyPlate?

The dietary breakdown of MyPlate matches MyPyramid but portrays the information as a clean visual: about 25% of your plate should be a protein, 25% should be grains (or a starchy vegetable), and the other 50% should be a combination of fruits and vegetables. Dairy is also shown as an add-on for meals (stuck on the side as a presumed glass of milk). Though every given meal obviously can’t fit this template, MyPlate’s greatest attribute is that it is simple to understand, making it particularly great for teaching children from a young age.

The resources that accompany MyPlate are phenomenal though perhaps not as well known. On www.choosemyplate.gov, you’ll find a hub of information like a MyPlate in-depth breakdown, printable handouts, meal plans, tip sheets, online quizzes, infographics, a BMI calculator, and more for a huge range of audiences including children, students, adults, families, professionals, and non-English speaking readers.

As a Registered Dietitian, my number one concern is always how I can best share healthy eating guidelines in a way that makes sense for patients and clients. I need to explain things in a way people can apply throughout their day without overcomplicating things and risking burnout. MyPlate does just that. While the guidelines are generalized and may need tweaking for individual needs, it’s overall a good mental image to keep yourself in check throughout the day. I highly recommend looking through the MyPlate site – and I challenge you to take the MyPlate quizzes and see how your knowledge stacks up.

Rise and Shine!

A new study found in Frontiers in Endocrinology links early morning behavior with lower BMI and lower risk of Type II DM.

Participants with pre-diabetes were given a score on something called the Composite Scale of Morningness, which was a number representing how early the like to wake up, go to sleep, and go about their day (physical and mental activity). ‘Morningness,’ or the tendency to do everything earlier than most, was linked to lower BMI, as was longer sleep duration. The findings were strongest for those 60 and older.

Would you shift your schedule for health benefits?

To read the original article, visit the text online here.

Food Label Health Claims Decoded

The FDA recently approved a qualified health claim linking macadamia nuts to heart health, allowing food packaging to state:

“Supportive but not conclusive research shows that eating 1.5 ounces per day of macadamia nuts, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol and not resulting in increased intake of saturated fat or calories may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. See nutrition information for fat [and calorie] content.”

My first reaction was, to be honest, excitement; I love macadamia nuts and am happy to hear that they may help protect my heart.

My second instinct, however, was to pause and wonder how other consumers may react to this. While I support nuts as a source of healthy fats and a major part of my diet, I do know that there is a lot of confusion surrounding food labels and the health claims asserted on packaging. Does this mean we should eat macadamia nuts every day? Will this treat heart disease? How much evidence is there behind this?

Luckily, labels are highly regulated, and a claim like this can be easily decoded with a bit of background.

The FDA allows the food industry to use health claims — statements which relate a certain ingredient to a health condition– when there is adequate scientific evidence supporting the relationship.  Different claims may highlight levels of nutrients (‘good source of vitamin A’) with approval, or they can tie a relationship between a nutrient and the functioning of the body (like ‘calcium builds strong bones’), though the FDA does not evaluate these claims and the label must reflect that. Companies cannot say that a nutrient is meant to diagnose, treat, or a cure a disease.

The gold-standard for claims are the Authorized ones, where there is such an abundance of evidence that the FDA supports the usage of these statements with confidence. There are only a handful of these claims (the list is found here), but some of the major ones include: Calcium/vitamin D and osteoporosis, saturated fat/cholesterol and heart disease, fruits/vegetables and cancer, and sodium and hypertension.

The list of ‘qualified’ claims is far longer– these are the statements that are supported by some body of research but not quite enough to be taken as undeniable fact. The FDA allows companies to use the statements but also requires a qualifying statement saying that, while there is evidence, it is not not enough to meet the rigorous standards of the FDA’s authorized claims.

For more on Qualified Health Claims, visit the FDA’s dedicated site: https://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/LabelingNutrition/ucm2006877.htm