Happy New Year: Crafting a Realistic Resolution

“New Year, New You!”
“This year, I’m going to be healthy!”
“My New Year’s diet starts today!”

New Year’s is the perfect time to hit the reset button — a fresh year represents a new start where you can commit to self improvement.  I love the idea of establishing a New Year’s resolution to help kick start your healthy changes, but it’s hard to overlook the tendency of resolutions to fizzle out by the end of February.

To stretch the lifespan of your resolution and create a long-lasting behavior, try making it a very specific goal.   The solution lies in a classic goal-setting acronym S.M.A.R.T. Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Time-Bound.  By tailoring your resolution

  • Specific: Define what actions you need to do to achieve your goal
    • If your overall goal is to be healthier, ask yourself HOW you will do that. Perhaps you want to eat more vegetables, less fast-food, or fewer refined sugars.
  • Measurable: How will you measure your success?
    • Avoid just stating you’ll do something “more” or “less” (work out more, eat more fruit, drink less coffee) and instead add a defined target goal, like eating at least 1 serving of fruit a day or going to the gym 3 times a week.
    • These concrete numbers will help you keep better track of your progress by giving you a reference point.
  • Attainable: Set goals you can realistically achieve
    • This is a huge part of setting successful goals- choose something that is challenging but doable, to make sure you can see it through.
    • If you haven’t touched a vegetable in years, it would be ambitious to say you’ll eat 3 servings of veggies every day. If you try to add one serving per day, though, you may stick with it much longer.
    • Similarly, you’re more likely to stick to “cutting back” than you are to “cutting out” foods or behaviors that aren’t particularly healthful. This will lead to sustainable behavior change so you can turn your resolution into your new norm.
  • Relevant: Is this goal going to help you achieve your big picture goal?
    • Here’s the key question: Will the specific goal you’re setting help you achieve the overall desired outcome?
    • If the answer is yes, then you’ve set a goal that aligns with your overall vision of health (relevant!).
    • If the answer is no, then your focus may have shifted throughout the process, so center your attention back on what it is you really hope to achieve.
  • Time-Bound: Factor in frequency or deadlines for your goals
    • There is no right or wrong timeline for a goal– it is entirely up to your current habits and your desired outcomes.
    • You might resolve to start eating at least one vegetable per day, one vegetable serving per meal, one new vegetable each week… They’re all worthwhile goals with a timing-specific limit (per day, per meal, each week).
    • Defining this aspect of frequency will help you be consistent, keep track of your actions, and know whether or not you’re hitting your target.

If you make your goals S.M.A.R.T, you will be able to gauge your success, stay dedicated, and hopefully see your resolution through for the year to come!

Wishing you a very happy, healthy 2019!

Rise and Shine!

A new study found in Frontiers in Endocrinology links early morning behavior with lower BMI and lower risk of Type II DM.

Participants with pre-diabetes were given a score on something called the Composite Scale of Morningness, which was a number representing how early the like to wake up, go to sleep, and go about their day (physical and mental activity). ‘Morningness,’ or the tendency to do everything earlier than most, was linked to lower BMI, as was longer sleep duration. The findings were strongest for those 60 and older.

Would you shift your schedule for health benefits?

To read the original article, visit the text online here.

Cutting Calories to Cut Cancer Risk

Many people try to lose weight to feel a bit better, move more easily, and maybe fit into that smaller pair of pants– but did you know that extra weight is also tied to about 20% of all cancers?

Because it’s difficult to control lifestyle factors at a major level, most studies linking weight to cancer are Observational in nature– meaning that we can look at what is happening in a population without actually controlling any variables. This data can be less reliable but, when many studies are viewed as a group, can indicate strong relationships. A study from The British Medical Journal evaluated over 200 observational studies and found a link between obesity, waist circumference, and weight gain and several cancers, with the strongest evidence linking obesity to esophageal, pancreatic, liver/gallbladder, colorectal, and kidney cancers — all related to the GI tract– as well as bone marrow and endometrial cancers. 

The mechanism underlying the causation is unknown, though National Cancer Institute believes that a few key factors may contribute to the relationship:

  • Inflammation: Obesity is generally accompanied by chronic inflammation, which is repeatedly linked to cellular dysfunction and cancer development.
  • Hormones: Fat cells tend to excrete more estrogen than other cells, which may increase risks of hormone-sensitive cancers like breast or ovarian.
  • Insulin: High body weight generally leads to higher insulin levels in the body, which may increase risk of colon, cancer, and endometrial cancers.

According to the American Cancer Society, the best advice for a cancer-free life is to stay lean without being underweight, meaning that a BMI between 18.5 and 25 (which is considered ‘normal’) is a good reference range. Even losing a small percentage of body weight can help lower health-related risks.

 

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